Bill Nighy - Blah Blah Blahs Theatre Company
17773
tshowcase-template-default,single,single-tshowcase,postid-17773,ajax_updown_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-1.0,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.1.1,vc_responsive

Bill Nighy

Bill Nighy

Bill Nighy

Bill Nighy starred on Broadway in David Hare’s The Vertical Hour and at London’s National Theatre in Hare’s Pravda and A Map of the World; on television he has starred in Hare’s “Page Eight,” and in the second and third installments of The Worricker Trilogy—“Turks and Caicos” and “Salting the Battlefield.” Additional London stage credits include National Theatre productions of Arcadia, Blue/Orange, and The Seagull; Betrayal at the Almeida Theatre; and A Kind of Alaska, at the Donmar.

 

He has starred in a wealth of films, including Love Actually; The Boat That Rocked; Valkyrie; Underworld: Evolution and Underworld: Rise of the Lycans; Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part One; The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel; About Time; and the recent Pride.  Additional television credits include the films “The Girl in the Café,” “The Young Visiters,” “State of Play,” “The Men’s Room,” “The Lost Prince,” and “Gideon’s Daughter.” Recently he has also starred in the feature film adaptation of classic British sitcom, “Dad’s Army,” out 5 February 2016, and 1940s comedy “Their Finest Hour and a Half.”

 

“Theatre does something nothing else can” says Mr Nighy. “It allows children to find things out about themselves and each other and the world in a singular fashion. It involves language and ideas as well as physical expression and an opportunity to investigate behaviour and manners and can uniquely  illuminate subjects such as history and politics. It is unbeatable in providing a framework for children to gain confidence and plays its part in the democratising process essential to a sane and balanced life. It does these things better than anything I’ve come across. Theatre Company Blah Blah Blah are an essential resource at a time when such things are dangerously undervalued” 

 

“I’ve worked for and with children of all ages and I’ve seen how [theatre] can reach them. It also offers a unparalleled opportunity for them to connect, rely upon and look out for one another and examine minutely language and human behaviour. It can also be, for the record, enormous fun and a crash course in humility. The Blahs are an exemplary example of how successful it can be. I’m proud to have been invited to associate myself with such an important company”